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Research & Funding

Past Other NCI & NIH InitiativesRSS

This page lists past other NCI and NIH cancer imaging initiatives, including grant mechanisms.

Requests for Application (RFA) are usually announced with special application dates; there is no possibility for applying after that date. Program Announcements (PA, PAR) may be open for a set period of time, such as 3 years or less; applications submitted in response to Program Announcements may be due on the standard dates (February 1, June1, and October 1) or may have special dates for receipt of applications. Please pay attention to these dates. Contact a CIP staff member if you have questions.

  • PA-10-009 Bioengineering Research Grants (BRG)(R01)

    • Release Date: October 14, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates apply
    • Expiration Date: January 8, 2013
    • Contacts:

      Houston Baker, Ph.D., NCI, Phone 301-594-9117, Email: bakerhou@mail.nih.gov

    Participating Institutes and Centers of the NIH invite applications for R01 awards to support Bioengineering Research Grants (BRGs) for basic and applied multi-disciplinary research that addresses important biological, bioengineering or medical research problems. The BRGs support multi-disciplinary research performed in a single laboratory or by a small number of investigators that applies an integrative, systems approach to develop knowledge and/or methods to prevent, detect, diagnose, or treat disease or to understand health and behavior. A BRG application may propose hypothesis-driven, discovery-driven, developmental, or design-directed research.

    See full description in NIH Guide: PA-10-009

  • PA-10-010: Exploratory/Developmental Bioengineering Research Grants (EBRG) (R21)

    • Release Date: October 14, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates apply
    • Expiration Date: January 8, 2013
    • Contacts:

      Houston Baker, Ph.D., NCI, Phone 301-594-9117, Email: bakerhou@mail.nih.gov

    This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is intended to encourage innovation and high risk/impact bioengineering research in new areas. While minimal or no preliminary data are expected to be described in the application, applications should clearly indicate the significance of the proposed work and that the proposed research and/or development is scientifically sound, that the qualifications of the investigators are appropriate, and that resources available to the investigators are adequate. An EBRG application may propose hypothesis-driven, discovery-driven, developmental, or design-directed research.

    Participating institutes are NIBIB, NICHD, NCI, NEI, NHLBI, NHGRI, NIA, NIAAA, NIAMS, NIDCD, NIDCR, NIDA, NIEHS, NIMH, and NINDS.

    See full description in NIH Guide:PA-10-010

  • PA-08-243:Etiology, Prevention, and Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (R01)

    • Release Date: August 19, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates apply
    • Expiration Date: September 8, 2011
    • Contacts:

      Heng Xie, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., NCI, Phone: 301-496-8866 Email: XieHe@mail.nih.gov

    This FOA encourages research activities in the broad areas of etiology and etiologic mechanism(s) of liver cancer, include, but are not limited to: (a) identification of viral and host factors in initiation of HCC, (b) examination of the development of HCC in the sequelae of HIV infection(c) development of animal models and in vitro virus cultivation methods; (d) development of prevention and control strategies, including chemoprevention; (e), validation of markers; (f) preclinical or clinical trials of promising agents; and (g) imaging studies for diagnosis and intervention.

    Research topics include research on the treatment and diagnosis of HCC, including
    Conduct of therapeutic clinical trials designed to evaluate novel anticancer agents with distinctive molecular targets, as well as therapeutic combinations of novel agents;
    Conduct of clinical translational research on promising biomarkers for determining prognosis and/or predicting response(s) to therapy;
    Development of functional imaging techniques that can reliably distinguish HCC from benign hepatic lesions;
    Conduct of clinical trials designed to evaluate the role, efficacy, and safety of image-guided local therapies, such as radio-frequency thermal ablation (RFA), particularly in relation to use of liver transplantation for patients with small HCC;
    Test of the utility of imaging modalities to evaluate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of targeted therapies;
    Evaluation of the use of imaging as a surrogate marker or endpoint for drug activity in therapeutic clinical trials; and
    Development of novel imaging approaches that can be used as diagnostic tools for early detection of HCC.

    URL: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-08-243.html