Skip to Content

Research & Funding

Past Other NCI & NIH InitiativesRSS

This page lists past other NCI and NIH cancer imaging initiatives, including grant mechanisms.

Requests for Application (RFA) are usually announced with special application dates; there is no possibility for applying after that date. Program Announcements (PA, PAR) may be open for a set period of time, such as 3 years or less; applications submitted in response to Program Announcements may be due on the standard dates (February 1, June1, and October 1) or may have special dates for receipt of applications. Please pay attention to these dates. Contact a CIP staff member if you have questions.

  • PA-08-243:Etiology, Prevention, and Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (R01)

    • Release Date: August 19, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates apply
    • Expiration Date: September 8, 2011
    • Contacts:

      Heng Xie, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., NCI, Phone: 301-496-8866 Email: XieHe@mail.nih.gov

    This FOA encourages research activities in the broad areas of etiology and etiologic mechanism(s) of liver cancer, include, but are not limited to: (a) identification of viral and host factors in initiation of HCC, (b) examination of the development of HCC in the sequelae of HIV infection(c) development of animal models and in vitro virus cultivation methods; (d) development of prevention and control strategies, including chemoprevention; (e), validation of markers; (f) preclinical or clinical trials of promising agents; and (g) imaging studies for diagnosis and intervention.

    Research topics include research on the treatment and diagnosis of HCC, including
    Conduct of therapeutic clinical trials designed to evaluate novel anticancer agents with distinctive molecular targets, as well as therapeutic combinations of novel agents;
    Conduct of clinical translational research on promising biomarkers for determining prognosis and/or predicting response(s) to therapy;
    Development of functional imaging techniques that can reliably distinguish HCC from benign hepatic lesions;
    Conduct of clinical trials designed to evaluate the role, efficacy, and safety of image-guided local therapies, such as radio-frequency thermal ablation (RFA), particularly in relation to use of liver transplantation for patients with small HCC;
    Test of the utility of imaging modalities to evaluate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of targeted therapies;
    Evaluation of the use of imaging as a surrogate marker or endpoint for drug activity in therapeutic clinical trials; and
    Development of novel imaging approaches that can be used as diagnostic tools for early detection of HCC.

    URL: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-08-243.html

  • PAR-09-219: Exploratory Innovations in Biomedical Computational Science and Technology (R21)

    • Release Date: August 17, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates
    • Expiration Date: Extended to September 8, 2013 (Original expiration date September 8, 2012)
    • Contacts:

      Peter Lyster, Ph.D., NIGMS, Phone: 301-451-6446, Email: lysterp@mail.nih.gov

    The NIH is interested in promoting research and developments in computational science and technology that will support rapid progress in areas of scientific opportunity in biomedical research. As defined here, biomedical informatics and computational biology includes database design, graphical interfaces, querying approaches, data retrieval, data visualization and manipulation, data integration through the development of integrated analytical tools, and tools for electronic collaboration, as well as computational and mathematical research including the development of structural, functional, integrative, and analytical computational models and simulations.

    See full description in NIH Guide:PAR-09-219

  • PAR-09-251:Optimization of Small Molecule Probes for the Nervous System (R21)

    • Release Date: August 13, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates apply
    • Expiration Date: September 8, 2012
    • Contacts:

      Mark Scheideler, Ph.D., Phone: 301-496-1779, Email: scheidelerm@ninds.nih.gov

    This FOA issued by participating institutes of the National Institutes of Health, encourages research grant applications from institutions/ organizations that propose to develop new small molecule probes for investigating biological function in the nervous system via the application of advanced medicinal chemistry and the biological testing of compounds. Eligible investigators will have identified probe candidates via screening of small molecule collections, using in vitro assays of biological activity developed to interrogate these collections, and be able to show that the structural features of these small molecules are related to their biological activity. Proposals should nominate small molecule probe candidates from distinct structural series for the further, iterative design and testing of analogues in structure-activity relationship studies, using in vitro assays of biological function adapted to the medium throughput screening requirements of this work. These studies should have the goal of developing a small molecule probe possessing the attributes (eg: affinity, selectivity, activity) required for its use in future pharmacological studies proposed by the investigator. Applicants are strongly encouraged to utilize publicly available cheminformatic capabilities for the acquisition of compounds, and semi-custom synthesis of analogues.

    Proposals should include both a biological and chemical component. The biological component should include a plan of in vitro and, when appropriate, limited in vivo assays, each capable of measuring the activity of a test compound towards an attribute that the "hit" compound proposed as a starting point for modification possesses, and that needs to be further enhanced or eliminated by redesign of the "hit".

    See full description in NIH Guide:
    R21: PAR-09-251
    R41/41 STTR: PAR-09-259
    R41/41 SBIR: PAR-09-260

  • PAR-09-218: Innovations in Biomedical Computational Science and Technology (R01)

    • Release Date: August 05, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates apply
    • Expiration Date: Extended to September 8, 2013 (Original expiration date September 8, 2012)
    • Contacts:

      Peter Lyster, Ph.D., NIGMS, Phone: 301-451-6446, Email: lysterp@mail.nih.gov

    The NIH is interested in promoting research and developments in biomedical informatics and computational biology that will support rapid progress in areas of scientific opportunity in biomedical research. As defined here, biomedical informatics and computational biology includes database design, graphical interfaces, querying approaches, data retrieval, data visualization and manipulation, data integration through the development of integrated analytical tools, and tools for electronic collaboration, as well as computational and mathematical research including the development of structural, functional, integrative, and analytical computational models and simulations.

    See full description in NIH Guide: PAR-09-218

  • PAR-09-220, 221: Innovations in Biomedical Computational Science and Technology Initiative (SBIR [R43/R44]), (STTR {R41/R42)]

    • Release Date: August 05, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates apply
    • Expiration Date: Extended to September 8, 2013 (Original expiration date September 8, 2012)
    • Contacts:

      Peter Lyster, Ph.D., NIGMS, Phone: 301-451-6446, Email: lysterp@mail.nih.gov

    This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) solicits Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant applications from small business concerns (SBCs) that propose innovative research in biomedical informatics and computational biology to promote the progress of biomedical research. There exists an expanding need to speed the progress of biomedical research through the power of computing to manage and analyze data and to model biological processes. The NIH is interested in promoting research and developments in biomedical computational science and technology that will support rapid progress in areas of scientific opportunity in biomedical research. As defined here biomedical computing or biomedical information science and technology includes database design, graphical interfaces, querying approaches, data retrieval, data visualization and manipulation, data integration through the development of integrated analytical tools, and tools for electronic collaboration, as well as computational research including the development of structural, functional, integrative, and analytical computational models and simulations.

    URLs:
    http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-09-220.html (SBIR)
    http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-09-221.html (STTR)

  • Non-Invasive Methods for Diagnosis and Progression of Diabetes, Kidney, Urological, Hematological and Digestive Diseases (R01) (NIDDK) (PA-09-181)

    • Release Date: May 01, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates apply
    • Expiration Date: May 8, 2012
    • Contacts:

      Maren R Laughlin, Ph.D., NIDDK, Phone: 301-594-8802, Email: ml33g@nih.gov

    This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is a call for the application of imaging and other non- or minimally-invasive technologies to detect, characterize, diagnose, identify persons with predisposition to, or monitor treatment of diseases of interest to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Also needed are new, robust surrogate markers for clinical trial endpoints, and new ways to characterize normal and pathological tissues in vivo. Diseases of interest include type 1 and 2 diabetes; acute and chronic kidney disease, liver, urologic, hematologic, digestive, endocrine, and metabolic diseases and their complications; obesity; obesity-related hypertension, hypertension, renal and vascular disorders leading to hypertension. Applicable techniques include molecular imaging and functional imaging approaches, imaging methods with high spatial, chemical or time resolution, metabolomics, proteomics, genomics, or new spectroscopic or sensor array technologies for monitoring metabolic or physiological events.

    URL: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-09-181.html

  • PAR-09-129: Solicitation of assays for high throughput screening (HTS) in the molecular libraries screening centers network (MLPCN)(R03)

    • Release Date: March 12, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: See below
    • Expiration Date: January 5, 2012
    • Contacts:

      Yong Yao, Ph.D., NIH Roadmap Molecular Libraries and Imaging, Phone: (301) 443-6102, Email: yyao@mail.nih.gov

    • Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): Letters of Intent Receipt Date(s): Apr. 13, 2009; Aug. 4, 2009; Dec. 4. 2009; Apr. 4, 2010; Aug. 3, 2010; Dec. 4, 2010; Apr. 4, 2011; Aug. 2, 2011; and Dec. 4, 2011.
    • Application Submission Date(s):May 13, 2009; Sept. 4, 2009; Jan. 4. 2010; May 4, 2010; Sept. 3, 2010; Jan. 4, 2011; May 4, 2011; Sept. 2, 2011; and Jan. 4, 2012.

    The NIH Molecular Libraries Roadmap Initiative wishes to solicit HTS assay applications from investigators who have the interest and capability to work with the Molecular Libraries Probe Production Centers Network (MLPCN) in support of chemical probe development. This FOA promotes discovery and development of new chemical probes as research tools for use by scientists in both the public and private sector to advance the understanding of biological functions and disease mechanisms.

    See full description in NIH Guide:PAR-09-129

  • PAR-09-089: The NCI Transition Career Development Award (K22)

    • Release Date: January 23, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates apply
    • Expiration Date: January 8, 2012
    • Contacts:

      Sonia Jakowlew, Ph.D., Phone: 301-496-8580, Email: jakowles@mail.nih.gov

    The major objective of the NCI Transition Career Development Award program is two-fold: (i) to provide a mechanism for stabilizing the career tracks of the most promising of investigators while they are establishing their first independent research programs and (ii) to create equal access to extramural career development opportunities to postdoctoral scientists in basic human cancer research working as Federal employees.

    See full description in NIH Guide:PAR-09-089

  • PAR-09-088: Established Investigator Award in Cancer Prevention & Control (K05)

    • Release Date: January 22, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates apply for K award
    • Expiration Date: January 8, 2012
    • Contacts:

      Shannon M. Lemrow, Ph.D., NCI, Phone: 301-496-8580, Email: lemrows@mail.nih.gov

    The objective of the NCI Established Investigator Award in Cancer Prevention and Control (K05) is to provide qualified researchers with protected time to devote to research and mentoring. The award is designed for established scientists who have already demonstrated a sustained, high level of research and mentoring productivity and who need K05 support to continue these activities. The K05 award will provide salary support of 25 to 50 percent of the institutional base salary (up to the current Federal salary cap limit) for three to five years based on a full-time, 12-month staff appointment, plus fringe benefits. The award requires the candidate to devote a minimum of 25 percent of full-time professional effort towards conducting the experimental research plan and the mentoring activities described in the application. The award also provides $25,000 per year in research-related expenses. It is renewable for one additional 5-year period.

    See full description in NIH Guide:PAR-09-088

  • PA-09-043: Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award (K23)

    The goal of the Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award (K23) program is to ensure a future cadre of well-trained scientists working in POR areas who will become competitive for NIH research project (R01) grant support. The specific objectives of the Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award are to:

    1)encourage research-oriented clinicians to develop independent research skills and gain experience in advanced methods and experimental approaches needed to become an independent investigator conducting patient-oriented research; 2) increase the pool of clinical researchers who can conduct patient-oriented studies, capitalizing on the discoveries of biomedical research and translating them to clinical settings; 3) support the career development of investigators who have made a commitment to focus their research endeavors on patient-oriented research.

    For the purposes of this award, Patient-Oriented Research is defined as research conducted with human subjects (or on material of human origin such as tissues, specimens and cognitive phenomena) for which an investigator directly interacts with human subjects. This area of research includes: 1) mechanisms of human disease; 2) therapeutic interventions; 3) clinical trials, and; 4) the development of new technologies. Studies falling under Exemption 4 for human subjects research are not included in this definition.

    See full description in NIH Guide:PA-09-043