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Research & Funding

Past Other NCI & NIH InitiativesRSS

This page lists past other NCI and NIH cancer imaging initiatives, including grant mechanisms.

Requests for Application (RFA) are usually announced with special application dates; there is no possibility for applying after that date. Program Announcements (PA, PAR) may be open for a set period of time, such as 3 years or less; applications submitted in response to Program Announcements may be due on the standard dates (February 1, June1, and October 1) or may have special dates for receipt of applications. Please pay attention to these dates. Contact a CIP staff member if you have questions.

  • PA-10-036: Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Institutional Research Training Grants (T32)

    The objective of the NRSA program is to provide predoctoral and postdoctoral research training opportunities for individuals interested in pursuing research careers in biomedical, behavioral and clinical research. Each NIH Institute and Center has a unique scientific purview and different program goals and initiatives that evolve over time. It is therefore critical that all applicants consult with the scientific/research contact at the relevant NIH Institute or Center for current information about program priorities and policies before preparing an application. This action is of utmost importance because applications with marginal or no relevance to the NIH awarding components participating in this funding opportunity announcement will not be accepted for review or considered for funding.

    See full description in NIH Guide:PA-10-036

  • PA-10-010: Exploratory/Developmental Bioengineering Research Grants(EBRG) [R21]

    • Release Date: October 14, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates apply
    • Expiration Date: January 8, 2013
    • Contacts:

      Houston Baker, Ph.D., NCI, Phone 301-594-9117, Email: bakerhou@mail.nih.gov

    The EBRG can support: 1) innovative, high-risk, high pay-off projects; 2) exploration of new approaches or concepts to a particular substantive area; 3) research and development of new technologies, techniques or methods; or 4) initial research and development of data upon which significant future research may be built. In keeping with the intent of the R21 program, there may or may not be any preliminary results.

    Participating institutes are NIBIB, NICHD, NCI, NEI, NHLBI, NHGRI, NIA, NIAAA, NIAMS, NIDCD, NIDCR, NIDA, NIEHS, NIMH, and NINDS..

    See full description in NIH Guide:PA-10-010

  • PA-10-009: Bioengineering Research Grants (BRG)(R01)

    • Release Date: October 14, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates apply
    • Expiration Date: January 8, 2013
    • Contacts:

      Houston Baker, Ph.D., NCI, Phone 301-594-9117, Email: bakerhou@mail.nih.gov

    Participating Institutes and Centers invite applications for R01 awards to support Bioengineering Research Grants (BRGs) for basic and applied multi-disciplinary research that addresses important biological, bioengineering or medical research problems. The BRGs support multi-disciplinary research performed in a single laboratory or by a small number of investigators that applies an integrative, systems approach to develop knowledge and/or methods to prevent, detect, diagnose, or treat disease or to understand health and behavior. A BRG application may propose hypothesis-driven, discovery-driven, developmental, or design-directed research.

    Please see the NIH Guide Notice for PA-10-009.

  • PA-10-009 Bioengineering Research Grants (BRG)(R01)

    • Release Date: October 14, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates apply
    • Expiration Date: January 8, 2013
    • Contacts:

      Houston Baker, Ph.D., NCI, Phone 301-594-9117, Email: bakerhou@mail.nih.gov

    Participating Institutes and Centers of the NIH invite applications for R01 awards to support Bioengineering Research Grants (BRGs) for basic and applied multi-disciplinary research that addresses important biological, bioengineering or medical research problems. The BRGs support multi-disciplinary research performed in a single laboratory or by a small number of investigators that applies an integrative, systems approach to develop knowledge and/or methods to prevent, detect, diagnose, or treat disease or to understand health and behavior. A BRG application may propose hypothesis-driven, discovery-driven, developmental, or design-directed research.

    See full description in NIH Guide: PA-10-009

  • PA-10-010: Exploratory/Developmental Bioengineering Research Grants (EBRG) (R21)

    • Release Date: October 14, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates apply
    • Expiration Date: January 8, 2013
    • Contacts:

      Houston Baker, Ph.D., NCI, Phone 301-594-9117, Email: bakerhou@mail.nih.gov

    This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is intended to encourage innovation and high risk/impact bioengineering research in new areas. While minimal or no preliminary data are expected to be described in the application, applications should clearly indicate the significance of the proposed work and that the proposed research and/or development is scientifically sound, that the qualifications of the investigators are appropriate, and that resources available to the investigators are adequate. An EBRG application may propose hypothesis-driven, discovery-driven, developmental, or design-directed research.

    Participating institutes are NIBIB, NICHD, NCI, NEI, NHLBI, NHGRI, NIA, NIAAA, NIAMS, NIDCD, NIDCR, NIDA, NIEHS, NIMH, and NINDS.

    See full description in NIH Guide:PA-10-010

  • PA-08-243:Etiology, Prevention, and Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (R01)

    • Release Date: August 19, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates apply
    • Expiration Date: September 8, 2011
    • Contacts:

      Heng Xie, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., NCI, Phone: 301-496-8866 Email: XieHe@mail.nih.gov

    This FOA encourages research activities in the broad areas of etiology and etiologic mechanism(s) of liver cancer, include, but are not limited to: (a) identification of viral and host factors in initiation of HCC, (b) examination of the development of HCC in the sequelae of HIV infection(c) development of animal models and in vitro virus cultivation methods; (d) development of prevention and control strategies, including chemoprevention; (e), validation of markers; (f) preclinical or clinical trials of promising agents; and (g) imaging studies for diagnosis and intervention.

    Research topics include research on the treatment and diagnosis of HCC, including
    Conduct of therapeutic clinical trials designed to evaluate novel anticancer agents with distinctive molecular targets, as well as therapeutic combinations of novel agents;
    Conduct of clinical translational research on promising biomarkers for determining prognosis and/or predicting response(s) to therapy;
    Development of functional imaging techniques that can reliably distinguish HCC from benign hepatic lesions;
    Conduct of clinical trials designed to evaluate the role, efficacy, and safety of image-guided local therapies, such as radio-frequency thermal ablation (RFA), particularly in relation to use of liver transplantation for patients with small HCC;
    Test of the utility of imaging modalities to evaluate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of targeted therapies;
    Evaluation of the use of imaging as a surrogate marker or endpoint for drug activity in therapeutic clinical trials; and
    Development of novel imaging approaches that can be used as diagnostic tools for early detection of HCC.

    URL: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-08-243.html

  • PAR-09-219: Exploratory Innovations in Biomedical Computational Science and Technology (R21)

    • Release Date: August 17, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates
    • Expiration Date: Extended to September 8, 2013 (Original expiration date September 8, 2012)
    • Contacts:

      Peter Lyster, Ph.D., NIGMS, Phone: 301-451-6446, Email: lysterp@mail.nih.gov

    The NIH is interested in promoting research and developments in computational science and technology that will support rapid progress in areas of scientific opportunity in biomedical research. As defined here, biomedical informatics and computational biology includes database design, graphical interfaces, querying approaches, data retrieval, data visualization and manipulation, data integration through the development of integrated analytical tools, and tools for electronic collaboration, as well as computational and mathematical research including the development of structural, functional, integrative, and analytical computational models and simulations.

    See full description in NIH Guide:PAR-09-219

  • PAR-09-251:Optimization of Small Molecule Probes for the Nervous System (R21)

    • Release Date: August 13, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates apply
    • Expiration Date: September 8, 2012
    • Contacts:

      Mark Scheideler, Ph.D., Phone: 301-496-1779, Email: scheidelerm@ninds.nih.gov

    This FOA issued by participating institutes of the National Institutes of Health, encourages research grant applications from institutions/ organizations that propose to develop new small molecule probes for investigating biological function in the nervous system via the application of advanced medicinal chemistry and the biological testing of compounds. Eligible investigators will have identified probe candidates via screening of small molecule collections, using in vitro assays of biological activity developed to interrogate these collections, and be able to show that the structural features of these small molecules are related to their biological activity. Proposals should nominate small molecule probe candidates from distinct structural series for the further, iterative design and testing of analogues in structure-activity relationship studies, using in vitro assays of biological function adapted to the medium throughput screening requirements of this work. These studies should have the goal of developing a small molecule probe possessing the attributes (eg: affinity, selectivity, activity) required for its use in future pharmacological studies proposed by the investigator. Applicants are strongly encouraged to utilize publicly available cheminformatic capabilities for the acquisition of compounds, and semi-custom synthesis of analogues.

    Proposals should include both a biological and chemical component. The biological component should include a plan of in vitro and, when appropriate, limited in vivo assays, each capable of measuring the activity of a test compound towards an attribute that the "hit" compound proposed as a starting point for modification possesses, and that needs to be further enhanced or eliminated by redesign of the "hit".

    See full description in NIH Guide:
    R21: PAR-09-251
    R41/41 STTR: PAR-09-259
    R41/41 SBIR: PAR-09-260

  • PAR-09-218: Innovations in Biomedical Computational Science and Technology (R01)

    • Release Date: August 05, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates apply
    • Expiration Date: Extended to September 8, 2013 (Original expiration date September 8, 2012)
    • Contacts:

      Peter Lyster, Ph.D., NIGMS, Phone: 301-451-6446, Email: lysterp@mail.nih.gov

    The NIH is interested in promoting research and developments in biomedical informatics and computational biology that will support rapid progress in areas of scientific opportunity in biomedical research. As defined here, biomedical informatics and computational biology includes database design, graphical interfaces, querying approaches, data retrieval, data visualization and manipulation, data integration through the development of integrated analytical tools, and tools for electronic collaboration, as well as computational and mathematical research including the development of structural, functional, integrative, and analytical computational models and simulations.

    See full description in NIH Guide: PAR-09-218

  • PAR-09-220, 221: Innovations in Biomedical Computational Science and Technology Initiative (SBIR [R43/R44]), (STTR {R41/R42)]

    • Release Date: August 05, 2009
    • Application Receipt Date: Standard dates apply
    • Expiration Date: Extended to September 8, 2013 (Original expiration date September 8, 2012)
    • Contacts:

      Peter Lyster, Ph.D., NIGMS, Phone: 301-451-6446, Email: lysterp@mail.nih.gov

    This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) solicits Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant applications from small business concerns (SBCs) that propose innovative research in biomedical informatics and computational biology to promote the progress of biomedical research. There exists an expanding need to speed the progress of biomedical research through the power of computing to manage and analyze data and to model biological processes. The NIH is interested in promoting research and developments in biomedical computational science and technology that will support rapid progress in areas of scientific opportunity in biomedical research. As defined here biomedical computing or biomedical information science and technology includes database design, graphical interfaces, querying approaches, data retrieval, data visualization and manipulation, data integration through the development of integrated analytical tools, and tools for electronic collaboration, as well as computational research including the development of structural, functional, integrative, and analytical computational models and simulations.

    URLs:
    http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-09-220.html (SBIR)
    http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-09-221.html (STTR)